SuperYR, the calendar I’ve always wanted // Kickstarter experience

SuperYR, the calendar I’ve always wanted // Kickstarter experience

I use Instagram. I browse Reddit. I read e-books (though I do get hardcopies for the books I love, I just think they’re better for re-reading your favourite stories since I like to jump around a lot).

One thing that I hate using are digital calendars. Yes, they give timely notifications and reminders. Never forget an appointment. But for planning? I think they suck. The information I need are never there at a glance, but in another tab. Oh there’s an event on that Saturday? Where? What time? Click. In for more information. Click. Out to the weekly view. Click. Out to monthly/yearly view. Click back in.

As for paper calendars, they’re easy and intuitive having grown up with them. They’re simple to use. Not perfect, you lose notifications, and it’s not something you keep on you at all times. But most of all, they’re not re-usable. A huge pain in the ass.

So I needed a simple, large and re-usable calendar. That was the promise of SuperYR and I was sold. Let me link to the SuperYR Kickstarter campaign here. Read on for my impressions on the SuperYR after a couple weeks of use.

Continue reading “SuperYR, the calendar I’ve always wanted // Kickstarter experience”

the long way to a small angry planet: a review

the long way to a small angry planet: a review

I wrote my first impressions on this book here when I was about a 100 pages in.

This is a short compilation of what I liked about the long way to a small angry planet. With some luck, you might like what I’ve got to say and give this book a shot too.

  1. It’s not ‘hard’ sci-fi. This book doesn’t throw around engineering and science fiction jargon around while expecting you to somehow understand it. It really is a book about a road-trip. Except that it’s through space, with stops on exotic planets, and the highway might be a black hole.  Continue reading “the long way to a small angry planet: a review”

Wind/Pinball and nostalgia

I have to begin with this: the introduction is beautifully written. In simple and evocative language, it tells his tale of how he came about to writing. Haruki Murakami’s life, hardships, inspiration, and writing process. If you read nothing else of this book, read the introduction.

wind pinball
The book in question on my desk

For the novels themselves, I can’t claim to understand what the stories are about or what the plot is. My initial thoughts were along the lines of: how was it possible that this was the first prize winner in a competition? (And that he’s a whacko.)

Continue reading “Wind/Pinball and nostalgia”

100 pages in: the long way to a small angry planet

thelongwaytoasmallangryplanet

It’s not ‘hard’ sci-fi heavy on jargon. Instead, it focuses very much on people.

The writing, in my head, doesn’t flow like poetry. It feels more… serviceable. It really helps get into the mind of Rosemary, not her real name, who’s the main perspective into the world. The language feels like words real people might think and say. It feels real. The world feels lived in.

Maybe this says more about me than the book but, the people do feel a bit too nice. But, there are also hints of stuff under the surface.

I loved the scene of Sissix and Ashby texting. It was funny and honestly read like one of those funny text message threads I see posted on Facebook.

It has been a real delight to read so far, and the incredible thing is that nothing’s really happened. Becky Chambers would be perfect to write slice-of-life stuff.

World End Economica: Episode 3 is out!

World End Economica: Episode 3 is out!

Finally. Finally it’s here.

I’m a little late to the party seeing that it was released on Steam in December 2016 but I look forward to finishing the game during the long weekend next week.

But really, it has been a long wait. Especially with the awkward cliffhanger ending of Episode 2, which led me to believe that the story wasn’t meant to be told episodically. Just as it was getting good it ended. The score on a rising high, the plot twists revealed, the protagonist just about to take action, and it just ends.

Now that all three episodes are out, and though I haven’t played the third and last episode, I think I can safely recommend WEE to anyone who wants to give the story a shot.

For an introduction to the story of World End Economica, I think I briefly wrote my thoughts on episode one here.

I think in voice, you think in text?

In my head, there’s a voice. It’s mine, and that’s how I think.

Different people think differently. Like in different languages. My mum thinks in Korean, myself in English.

But I didn’t realise just how differently people could think.

I mean, there are people who think in TEXT!

Scrolling right-left like the news ticker, upwards like the iconic Star Wars crawl, or coming together like in Word.

They have fonts. Helvetica, Comic Sans, Times New Roman.

And colours. And font sizes!?

Mind freaking blown. Amazing.